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20130124
20130201
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
no recourse if that united states senate of an opposite party of the president decides we're shutting down the confirmation process because frankly, you know that can be done. is that -- i mean, you know, there are no recourse at all for the executive branch here? >> yeah, the next election is the recourse for the executive branch. >> that could be four years. could you hold up cabinet appointments for four years. >> it could be two years. of course, it could. the founders put that in the constitution there about 1 1100 positions in the government that require advice and consent. it's there for a purpose. i was nominated by the first president bush to be education secretary. the senate held me up for three months. they had a right to do it. so the president has to keep sending people until he finds someone who can gain the support of the senate. that's one of the checks we have against an imperial presidency. >> you hope the supreme court upholds this broad ruling that basically eliminates recess appointments? >> i do, but i doubt they will. but i suspect they will narrow the decision at l
the united states senate. and that's because despite the obvious frustrations of recent days and years, a frustration that we all share this place remains one of the most extraordinary institutions of any kind on the face of the earth. on occasion we all heard a senator leave here and take their leave condemning the senate for being broken, an impossible setting in which to try to do the people's business. well, i want to be very clear about my feelings. i do not believe the senate is broken. certainly not as an institution. there is nothing wrong with the senate that can't be fixed by what's right about the senate. the predominant and weighty notion that 100 american citizens chosen by their neighbors to serve from states is different as massachusetts and montana can always choose to put parochial or personal interests aside and find the national interest. i believe it is the honor of a lifetime, an extraordinary privilege to have represented the commonwealth of massachusetts and the united states senate for more than 28 years. what a remarkable gift it has been to carry the banner of
senate, and the united states people in a national discussion of how much taxes, how much spending, how much debt we're going to be able to have and get by and do. and so that is really, really critical, and that process has been gone for four years. we are stumbling from crisis to crisis, secret meeting after secret meeting and secret group after secret group, it has not worked. we ned a public discussion. then we layout how much we're going to spend and how much we are going to tax. bill: doesn't the law say that you have to have a budget? >> bill, it explicitly in the united states code passed in 1974 the senate and the house should pass a budget by april 15th. it should be in the committee marked up by april 1st. those have not been done. and it's just been a direct violation of law. and i've been as you know a big critic of that. it's unthinkable. bill: from new york i've heard you loud and clear. one more think quickly, jack lew treasury secretary. you have said strong words against him. why is he unfit for that job. >> first he went before the public as 2011 as budget director an
involved want to get out ahead of the president of the united states to lay out their vision. the balance, if you will, in terms of a pathway to citizenship along with enforcement. here is one of the key republicans making his point. >> the president wants to go and basically chart a difficult path. and what i have heard about what he is going to say, he is going to say there is no lead to link a pathway to citizenship to border security. excuse me, mr. president? the last time we provide ad pathway to citizenship and didn't secure our border was in 1986. i'm not going to do that again. >> reporter: as it is there is no guaranty the bipartisan proposal would pass the house of representatives. they have work ahead trying to sell the house on it but, it if you take enforcement out of the plan the feeling up here on capitol hill it will be a no-go in terms of bipartisan support, patti ann. patti ann: mike, people see this as kind of a unique opportunity, a good time to strike on this issue? >> reporter: no question about that. post-election the feeling is this is the time to strike. the amer
criticism he is not tough enough on iran. senators will get to ask him about that during his nomination hearing which happens tomorrow. the experts say they did not see this coming. the economy in the united states shrink at the end of last year according to the commerce department. first slow down since the recession ended more than three years ago. economists say they don't think this means we are headed for another recession. wendell goler is live at the white house. it was a small drop today, but it did raise a lot of eyebrows, initially. >> well, you are right, shepard. the strongest quarter of the year was followed by a negative one. the slide blamed on dwindling exports, slow growth in company stocks and biggest decline in defense spending in 40 years. the economy went from 3.1% growth from july through september to a minus tenth of a percent last three months of the year. the white house both down played the decline and put part of the blame on republicans. >> home prices are starting to climb back. consumer confidence overall has been rising and consumer spending has been risin
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)